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We have some neighbors flying the flag of their country,... Originally Posted by Mimi We have some neighbors flying the flag of their country, I know that if they are ...
  1. #1
    EmailPoster is offline Junior Member
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    Default Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    We have some neighbors flying the flag of their country,...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mimi
    We have some neighbors flying the flag of their country, I know that if they
    are flying it with the American Flag the Am Flag needs to be on top. What
    is the feeling about just flying the one country flag by itself? I was
    thinking that it might be disrespectful to the country they are in but
    wanted a second opinion before bringing this to their attention.



    Thanks so much.

  2. #2
    ungraspable Guest

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    Mimi-
    First of all, thank you for your concern. It is people like you that will keep America's pride in check. It is great that your neighbors want to show respect and pride for their country, however, equal respect should be shown to the American flag. If they wish to only fly their country’s flag, well then I suggest they return to their country. They must realize that they have made America their home, and therefore must submit to the country’s rules. It is fine if they do not want to show American pride, but they should not by all means show disrespect. Simply they either display both flags or no flag at all. If they do decide to display both flags, they should not fly on the same rod. Instead, both flags get their own rod, but must be approximately equal in size and flown at the same height. Flying one flag higher than the other is disrespectful to the other country, even if it is not our country. This is significant to show that America is at a time of peace with the other country. Please be sure to let neighbors realize that America is respectful of other countries, but citizens do have proper conduct to maintain.
    I hope you have a great day, and good luck with your neighbors!
    Ashley

  3. #3
    jproffitt10 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmailPoster
    We have some neighbors flying the flag of their country,...
    Mimi,

    While it is not likely that your neighbors will face any criminal or civil penalties for their patriotism in regards to whatever national flag they are displaying, it isn't right and they will likely suffer the obvious disdain at least one of their neighbors, though hopefully more. According to the U.S. Flag Code, "No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any other national or international flag equal, above, or in position of superior prominence or honor to, or IN PLACE OF, the flag of the United States at any place within the United States or an territory or possession thereof."

  4. #4
    LindaN Guest

    Default Communist flag

    I'm wondering what you think if the flag is communist IE Cuban. One is flying without the American flag on an appartment house in my town. The guy flying it is collecting just about every freebie we taxpayers have to contribute to, SSI, welfare, etc.

    LindaN

  5. #5
    Peter Ansoff is offline USA Flag Site Admin
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    Greetings, everyone,

    I think that the previous posters on this thread are missing an important point. Flying the flag of another country does not necessarily mean that the flyer is expressing allegience to that country, or denying allegiance to the USA.

    A few years ago, one of my fellow vexillologists came up with what he called a "typology of flag behavior." Basically, it's a list of reasons for flying a flag -- or, more exactly, of the messages that flying a flag can convey. Here is a slightly edited version of the list, with examples of each one:

    WHAT DOES A FLAG MEAN?

    1. I am the property of, or responsible for, the entity that this flag represents. (Example: flag at the entrance to a national park.)

    2. I am subject to the laws of the entity that this flag represents. (Example: flag on a US merchant ship at sea or in a foreign port.)

    3. I am an official representative of the entity that this flag represents (Examples: flag on a US Navy warship or on a US government office.)

    4. I owe allegience to the entity that this flag represents. (Example: a citizen flying the US flag on his house.)

    5. I have an emotional or cultural attachment to the entity that this flag represents. (Example: a person of Polish ancestry flying the Polish flag on his house.)

    6. I wish to show my respect for the entity that this flag represents. (Example: flying the British flag to commemorate the Queen's birthday.)

    The point is that a national flag can mean any one of these things, depending on the circumstances. We shouldn't jump to the conclusion that a flag flying on a private citizen's home is always intended to be #4; it could also be a #5 or a #6. I'm sure that there are many cases in which a citizen would like to do both, say #4 and #5, but cannot because he/she doesn't have enough flagpoles!

    ungraspable: "If they wish to only fly their country’s flag, well then I suggest they return to their country. They must realize that they have made America their home, and therefore must submit to the country’s rules. It is fine if they do not want to show American pride, but they should not by all means show disrespect."

    jproffitt10: "While it is not likely that your neighbors will face any criminal or civil penalties for their patriotism in regards to whatever national flag they are displaying, it isn't right"

    There is no "rule" that says you have to fly the US flag, or that you're not supposed to fly another country's flag. As discussed above, flying another country's flag does not necessarily show disrespect, or express patriotism for another country. It could be an affirmation of a person's heritage, or a friendly recognition of another country's holiday.

    jproffitt10: "and they will likely suffer the obvious disdain at least one of their neighbors, though hopefully more.

    My neighbors are from Korea. On August 15th last year, I flew the Korean flag on the house to mark Korean Liberation Day. The neighbor lady smiled radiantly when she saw it, and thanked me profusely for honoring their holiday. If she felt "disdain," it sure wasn't "obvious!"

    jproffitt10: "According to the U.S. Flag Code, "No person shall display the flag of the United Nations or any other national or international flag equal, above, or in position of superior prominence or honor to, or IN PLACE OF, the flag of the United States at any place within the United States or an territory or possession thereof.""

    This sentence was not originally part of the flag code. It was added in 1954, at the height of the McCarthy era, and its intent was to show disdain for the United Nations (which McCarthy hated). It was unnecessary, because it really didn't say anything that wasn't already in the code -- the code already said that the US flag should have precedence over other nations' flags. It was also very poorly written and full of ambiguities. For example: what does "equal" mean? If it means that you're not supposed to fly another nation's flag at the same level as the US flag, then it contradicts paragraph 7g of the code, as well as centuries of international custom. And what does "in place of" mean? Either you're flying the US flag, or you are not.

    LindaN: I'm wondering what you think if the flag is communist IE Cuban. One is flying without the American flag on an appartment house in my town.

    Linda has a point here, but it's tricky. Going back to my friend's typology, what exactly do we mean by "the entity that this flag represents?" Do we mean Cuba, a proud historic land with a vibrant culture, or do we mean the Communist dictatorship that has ruled that country since 1959? (The Cuban flag existed long before 1959.) I suspect that the person flying the flag in Linda's town is thinking of the former rather than the latter. This is a symbolic problem that is faced by many immigrant groups -- they want to affirm their heritage, but don't want to show support for an obnoxious regime. Here in Virginia, the Vietnamese community flies the old flag of the Republic of (South) Vietnam, and that flag has been officially recognized by the state government as a symbol of Vietnamese heritage.

    One of the finest things about the USA is that we and our ancestors came from all over the world, and that we're doing our best to build a society that accomodates all. There's nothing unpatriotic about remembering where we came from, or honoring the holidays of those who came from elsewhere. On the contrary; doing so makes us a stronger and better nation. Just ask my Korean neighbor.

    Regards,

    Peter Ansoff

  6. #6
    Newnewfie is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    I am a Canadian citizen and for the past 17 years have spent my winters in Florida (6 Months/year). The other day I displayed the Canadian flag alone on my Mobile home in honour of 2 fallen Canadian soldiers who died in Aphganistan. I have been told by the park manager that I must remove the flag or fly it with an American flag. In Canada where many US citizens reside or vacation, they display the US flag alone without any concern for the Canadian flag. I respect the flags of both countries and on special occasions, fly both.

  7. #7
    Peter Ansoff is offline USA Flag Site Admin
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    Greetings, Newnewfie!

    As far as I know, there is no US federal restriction on flying foreign flags by themselves -- I do it all the time here at my house. (You'll always see the Canadian flag here on the first of July!) However, some state and local jurisdictions have funny laws, and it's possible that some may address such things. Also, the owners of your trailer park can basically make whatever rules they want to.

    If you think it's worth pursuing, you might want to ask your park manager what the basis for the rule is -- is it a law, a park regulation, just something that he/she made up on the spur of the moment?

    Hope all is well in Newfieland! I've never visited that part of the world, and I hope to one of these days.

    Peter Ansoff

  8. #8
    quicker is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    Peter.

    I agree with the idea of a nation of many and tolerance but I also believe in a system of unity to protect just that. This idea of a national flag also protects all from the division that can be caused by larger or smaller numbers of different nationalities. The use of one flag as a primary flag is very helpful at bridging the differences that can be encountered. The lack of enforcement or unification of a language is bad enough and leaves many turning to the issue of the flag as a last stand for the unity and respect for a country always changing and expanding its diversity. So as much as it is not an enforceable rule it in my opinion Helps to not only fly your country of heritage but to also fly a American flag next to it.

    I am originally from Canada and in my country many Americans fly the American flag and most out of common respect also flew the Canadian flag next to it.

    Rule or not I would always suggest showing both your heritage and your American allegiance. This way you don’t have to worry about anyone misunderstanding your intentions.

    Quicker

  9. #9
    Peter Ansoff is offline USA Flag Site Admin
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    Hello, Quicker -- welcome!

    Rule or not I would always suggest showing both your heritage and your American allegiance. This way you don’t have to worry about anyone misunderstanding your intentions.

    This is a good point. Unfortunately, not everyone has the luxury of being able to fly two flags on separate poles! The alternative of flying one above the other is (IMO), worse than not flying the US flag at all.

    An elegant solution, it seems to me, would be for national and cultural groups to create "heritage flags" that symbolize, in one flag, both their US allegience and their heritage. The case of the Vietnamese community that I mentioned in an earlier post here is the closest example that I know about -- they use the old yellow and red flag of the RVN as a symbol of Vietnamese culture, and it's officially recognized as such in many US communities (including here in my state of Virginia). One could imagine, for example, a Cuban-American flag that would symbolize the flyer's heritage without reference to the Cuban political regime.

    I frequently fly foreign flags here at the house for another reason -- to recognize the holidays of other nations. In these cases, it would be awkward to fly the US flag as well, because it's their holiday, not ours. The usage varies, of course. For example, US Memorial Day is also Canadian Remembrance Day, so I fly both flags. However, Canada Day is a uniquely Canadian holiday, so I fly the Canadian flag by itself.

    Peter A.

  10. #10
    groversmith@hotmail.com is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Flying Another Country's Flag in USA

    Dear Newnewfi don't let it bother you , if after you explained why and the park still tells you to take it down find a park that understands and go there . Know also we have parks and neighbor hoods that out law the flying of an American flag . I fly my flag (USA) and respect others , especially visitors fags . If you have two poles you could fly both and thus diffuse potential problems . After all it would be a small price to pay to encourage the close relationship we have had since 1815 .

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