34 star flag questions??

Discussion in 'Flag Identification and Collecting' started by nkcsweetie, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    i'm new at this i'm thinking my first posting didn't make it :) but i just ran across this flag in the mtns of NC, i had to get it, i'm not a collector but thought it was cool to find, it's a huge flag 14ft x 8ft, so displaying it will be hard, so i have no clue on what to do with it. my question is where did this flag come from and how was it used?? it has a name "cushman" written on it, please any information would help, hoping it was a good find...thanks Pictures by nkcsweetie - Photobucket
     
  2. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Welcome to the USA Flag Forum, and thanks for posting the picture.

    North Carolina is an odd place to find such a large Yankee flag! I own a 34-star flag that measures 15ft x 23ft and it was flown from a yacht owned by a wealthy New Englander. Your flag has a heading and grommets (hand worked) that generally indicate use on land. (Flags on ships usually had a rope sewn into the heading.) It looks like a professionally made flag that may have been used in the early days of the secession debate but was quietly put away after NC seceded from the Union. Unless you can find a local connection to that name on the heading, your flag is just one of thousands made during the Civil War to honor the good ole USA.

    May I ask how much you had to pay for that flag?

    Nick A
    Columbia MD
     
  3. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    THanks....I paid $250 for the flag, don't know if that was a little to much. I've always been interested in the civil war era so i couldn't leave it, LOL....The guy I bought it from told me he bought it from a school auction near little switzerland NC around 1960, the school would get some items from Philadelphia PA. There is some other writing near the the cushman name but i can't seem to make it out. I would love to know the value of the flag. Thanks again for helping :)
     
  4. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    If the flag was a lot smaller, say only 5 or 6 feet long, it would be worth $3000 to $4000. If it had an interesting star pattern, even more. However, huge flags are a real problem to display, and a pattern of stars in rows is commonplace. Recently a 10x18 foot 38-star flag in excellent condition sold on eBay for about $1000, so your Civil War era flag should be worth at least that much.

    Nick A
     
  5. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    thanks again..i'm really curious on the maker, i've tried to do some research on the name but came up with nothing....right now i've folded it and have it on display in a shadow box, probably going to take it to some civil war events going on in town to share it...:) also I forgot to ask, my husband was curious on some of the stains on the flag looks like tar spots, they seems to be all over the red and white stripes, does that have any effect on value of the flag. thanks
     
  6. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    hello, just letting some of you know i just udated some pictures of the flag, trying to show just how large it really is (was very stressful for me, trying to be EXTRA careful..) after looking more closely to the name "cushman" it does look to say 5 yd briga?? thinking it was suppose to be brigade...i'm hoping this will help try to see where this flag was at.... :) Pictures by nkcsweetie - Photobucket
     
  7. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Very curious. I'm not sure that flags of this size would have been used by a bridgade headquarters. It IS the size that I would expect to see flying from a brig (two-mast square sailed ship).

    Nick
     
  8. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    thanks for the help....we will look into that :)
     
  9. csaanv

    csaanv Member

  10. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

  11. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    i'm super excited the North Carolina museum of history called and wants to set up an appt. sept 30th with a couple of experts to take a look at my flag!! so i'll update on what they had to say about it :)
     
  12. csaanv

    csaanv Member

    Very cool. Was this Tom Bolton?
     
  13. AmericaHurrah

    AmericaHurrah Member

    There was a Civil War accoutrements outfitter in Columbus, OH by that name. Geo. W. Cushman. He was in business with a guy named David Rees and the business was Cushman & Rees initially, but then Cushman either bought him out or went out on his own. Usually flag-makers used a stencil and a penciled or penned mark is that of an owner, but it's hard to tell here for sure. The marking of the number of yards underneath in the same ink makes me think that could possibly be a maker's or seller's labeling. Cushman appears to have primarily been a saddle maker and leatherworker, but he may have sold all manner of equipment acquired from elsewhere.
     
  14. csaanv

    csaanv Member

    Hurrah,
    I agree it is possible that this could be the flag-makers signature but it was much more common that the owners would sign their flags. I have about a half a dozen or so flags from late 19th century to early 20th century with names on the headers. I never seen a flag-maker sign his flag instead of stamping or stencil but I could be wrong, I have just never seen it done. Do we have any measurements for this flag? Is 5 yards about 15 feet?

    Cheers,
    Mike
     
  15. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    hey Mike,

    The flag is about 14ft x 8ft, so it's quite large....it does say 5 yd but has some other writing next to that, can't seem to make it out looks like brig...
     
  16. csaanv

    csaanv Member

    Thanks, I was guessing the 5 yd was about 15 feet.
     
  17. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    The larger flag makers that were active during the Civil War did, indeed, us stencils. Hortmann of Philadelphia, and Annin and Co. stenciled their name on the heading. I would not be surprised to find smaller flagmakers use an ink signature, however.

    Nick A
    Columbia MD
     
  18. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    That should have been "Horstmann" of Philadelphia:

    Horstmann Brothers Philadelphia
    One of the largest military goods manufacturers in America, Commissioned by the Philadelphia Depot to produce Pennsylvania battle flags during the war. They made many flags for Pennsylvania regiments and surrounding states. They also produced a few C.S.A. flags early in the war and advertised in Richmound in 1860. The Horstmann firm was founded by William H. Horstmann (1785-1850), who had emigrated to Philadelphia from Germany in 1816. Horstmann bought out a local sword maker in 1828 and thereafter entered the military goods field. The firm benefited from the Civil War, becoming the largest military goods producer in the nation by 1864, with an estimated worth of over one million dollars
     
  19. nkcsweetie

    nkcsweetie New Member

    Right now there is a 34 star flag large like mine selling on ebay...curious on the star arrangment, i've been doing ALOT of research on this flag and I've never come across a 6-7-7-7-7, i'm guessing my 7-7-6-7-7 is probably more common????
     
  20. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Based on the photos of 34-star flags on Flickr:
    Flickr: Search nicka21045's photostream
    there is no such thing as a more common pattern .:eek:

    Nick A
    Columbia Maryland
    The Old Line State
     

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