6 flag pole question.

Discussion in 'US Flag Display' started by mattm, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. mattm

    mattm New Member

    I've got 6 flag poles. 3 on either side of a road. I have to fly on each side 2 US and 1 state flag. I know that if the poles are the same size it goes US, US, state. But my poles are different heights. Facing the poles on the left side of the road they are short, medium, tall. Then on the right side of the road they are tall, medium, short. Does height take precedence over left to right? Do I fly them State,US,US ROAD US,US,State ??

    [​IMG]
     
  2. mattm

    mattm New Member

    I think I hear crickets.........
     
  3. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Well . . . if you want to get very technical, there's no way to do it without violating the flag code. Section 7f says:

    "When the flags [of States, cities or localities] are flown from adjacent staffs . . . No such flag or pennant may be placed above the flag of the United States or to the United States flag’s right."

    For practical purposes, I'd say that height should take precedence over right-to-left. The average observer is more likely to interpret height as an indication of superiority or subordination. The right-to-left precedence is a well-established convention, but is less likely to be a concern to the non-specialist. (However, stand by for the nit-pickers who want to beat you over the head with the flag code!)

    There is an apartment complex near my house that has a somewhat similar arrangement at their entrance: Three poles of decreasing height in a line. They normally fly US flags on all three poles. There's nothing really wrong with that, I suppose, but it always looks strange to me.

    Peter Ansoff
     
  4. mattm

    mattm New Member

    Thanks Peter. I guess we'll let'm fly and see what happens. I appreciate your response.
     
  5. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    ...
    Hi, MattM !!! :D

    Welcome to the USA-Flag-Site Forums !!! :D


    I agree with Peter and the way you have it drawn and notated with the American Flags being on the taller poles. Even if Peter thought differently, I'd still think that the height of the poles that the American Flags are flown from takes precedence over the "left vs. right" tradition.

    Besides, if you think of ALL the Flags as being part of a SINGLE display, then, in my opinion, having the American Flags in the center on the tallest poles would make sense and be in keeping (more or less) with the "Flag Code".


    Thank You for bringing your Flag-related question to our Forums !!!



    Robin Hickman
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
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  6. flagnazi

    flagnazi Member

    MattM: Just out of curiosity, why the two US flags on each side? Would it be possible to do a current US flag on the two tallest poles left and right and then purchase a historic flag of the US to fly on the second pole? That will keep everyone guessing. I don't know, what do you think Robin and Peter? I like Peter's response, most people won't know the difference with the exception of a few.

    Mike Doyle
    Lava Hot Springs, ID
     
  7. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    ...
    Hi, MattM ! :D
    Hi, Mike ! :D

    I had be wondering the same thing about the doubled-up U.S. Flags, but I chose not to say anything about it at the time.

    MattM, perhaps you can put the State flags into the second (middle) positions and your County's OR City's Flags in the third (outside) positions?

    Or maybe replace the U.S. Flags in the second (middle) positions with POW*MIA Flags?

    [​IMG]


    Just a thought (or two)..... :cool:


    Robin Hickman
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    ...
     
  8. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    Re: 6 flag pole question. - Advice Clarification !

    ...
    My suggestion (above) regarding including the POW*MIA Flag in the second order of precedence (in the middle spot) is, apparently, valid only SIX (6) days a year according to a GSA bulletin (effective 6-10-2008).

    A copy of that GSA Bulletin can be found HERE :http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/more/powmia.htm

    The SIX (6) days delineated in the GSA bulletin are as follows :
    1. Armed Forces Day (Third Saturday in May)
    2. Memorial Day (Last Monday in May)
    3. Flag Day (June 14th)
    4. Independence Day (July 4th)
    5. National POW/MIA Recognition Day (by Presidential Proclamation; historically, the third Friday of September)
    6. Veterans' Day (November 11th)

    The part of the GSA Bulletin that is pertinent here is contained in Section 4, sub-section f.

    4. What action must I take?
    f. What is the official protocol for displaying the POW/MIA flag? When displayed from a single flag pole, the POW/MIA flag should fly directly below, and be no larger than, the flag of the United States. If on separate poles, the flag of the United States always should be placed to the right of other flags. On the six national observances for which Congress has ordered display of the POW/MIA flag, it is generally flown immediately below or adjacent to the flag of the United States as second in order of precedence." (Emphasis Added)


    Apparently for the other 359 days (or 360 in a Leap Year) the "order of precedence" should be : 1.) U.S. Flag, 2.) State Flag, and 3.) POW*MIA Flag.

    Sorry for my confusion. I hope it didn't rub off on anyone!



    Robin hickman
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
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  9. cgmiller

    cgmiller New Member

    Re: 6 flag pole question. NOT

    I found the response with the GSA Memo interesting. However: I do not believe the GSA make Law. Title 4, USA Flag Code, Par 7.f. says:

    "When flags of States, cities, or localities, or pennants of societies are flown on the same halyard with the flag of the United States, the latter should always be at the peak. When the flags are flown from adjacent staffs, the flag of the United States should be hoisted first and lowered last. No such flag or pennant may be placed above the flag of the United States or to the United States flag’s right."

    I take this to mean that only the listed flags may be flown on the same pole or halyard as the American flag. The POW Flag, McDonald's flag, Remembrance flag, or cocktails flag are not listed and cannot be flown. However, the Boy Scouts flag, city's Historical Society flag, Army flag, or Save the Spotted Owl Society flags could be flown.

    Any discussion?
     
  10. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    I found the response with the GSA Memo interesting. However: I do not believe the GSA make Law. Title 4, USA Flag Code, Par 7.f. says:

    It's true that the GSA memo is a regulation, not a law. Even if it did conflict with the flag code, however, it would not matter. The GSA memo addresses the display of the flag on government installations administered by the GSA. The flag code does not apply to the GSA -- it is "established for the use of such civilians or civilian groups or organizations as may not be required to conform with regulations promulgated by one or more more of the executive departments of the Government of the United States." (Sec. 5)

    Having said that, the GSA memo is pretty much irrelevant to the earlier discussion about displays of the USA, State and MIA flags, because US Government installations do not generally fly state flags. Here in Washington DC, many of the Executive departments fly the US, POW/MIA and Department flags.

    Peter Ansoff
     

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