Colorado stylized C mystery

Discussion in 'US Flag Specs and Design' started by mjb, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. mjb

    mjb New Member

    Hello. I'm a new member of the forum. I just joined to ask about the Colorado state flag.

    Here's what the Colorado Revised Statutes say about the flag design:

    For the most part, I get it, but when they talk about the "inner line of the opening" and "outer line of the opening", I'm unsure what they really mean.

    Option 1: the inner and outer "lines" are actually the arcs that are missing from the edges of the two circles (the arcs of length 150 & 300 in the close-up example below):

    [​IMG]


    Option 2: the inner and outer "lines" are the imaginary vertical lines that would join the endpoints of those arcs—that is, they are the chords, or the "width" of the arcs:

    [​IMG]


    The second option results in a very slightly larger angle for the "mouth" of the C—a hair under 0.77 radians, rather than exactly 0.75 radians.

    Below are links to the full-size renderings, to illustrate the difference. In both, you'll see that the red disc radius is 400, and the gold disc radius is 200. Thus the "body or bar" of the C is 200, the "inner line of the opening" is 150, and the "outer line of the opening" is 300.
    • Option 1, 0.75 radian mouth, inner & outer lines are arcs: SVG or PNG
    • Option 2, ~0.77 radian mouth, inner & outer lines are chords: SVG or PNG
    So, which interpretation do you think is intended?

    If you choose Option 1, do you have any tips on how to draw it (e.g. with ruler & compass) when the arc length (the curved part) can't be directly measured?

    Thanks for your time!
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2015
  2. mjb

    mjb New Member

    I'm also ready to admit that I have completely misinterpreted the instructions and that it's actually neither of the options.

    Here in Colorado, I see many variations of the flag design, not just on flags but on T-shirts, bumper stickers, etc., and about 95% of them look a little "off" in some way.
     

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