Flag displayed on t-shirts

Discussion in 'Other US Flag Etiquette' started by Barb, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. Barb

    Barb New Member

    Hi there,

    Quick question: I see many t-shirts with a graphic of the flag displayed vertically with the union in the top right. I want to say this is incorrect, but I see SO many, can that many shirt designers be wrong?

    One other question, what about the thin blue line incorporated into american flags? I didn't think you could alter the stripes, but many law enforcement people I know, have this sticker on their vehicles.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Hi Barb -- welcome to the forum!

    I see many t-shirts with a graphic of the flag displayed vertically with the union in the top right. I want to say this is incorrect, but I see SO many, can that many shirt designers be wrong?

    It's wrong, but it's an understandable mistake. When the flag displayed horizontally, the union goes on the flag's right/viewer's left. If you rotate the image to print it vertically with the hoist is at the top, then the union ends up on the flag's left/viewer's right. However, the flag code says specifically that the union should be on the flag's right, regardless of which way the flag is oriented. This can cause a problem when the US flag is displayed vertically beside another flag, especially if the other flag contains writing (like many state flags). If you display them both with the upper hoist on their right, the writing on the other flag will be backwards. The alternative is to have the US flag with the union on the right, and other flag with the upper hoist on the left, which looks strange. In my opinion, this is a flaw in the flag code that should be corrected.

    what about the thin blue line incorporated into american flags?

    This is an American version of some symbolism that originated in Britain to show support for law enforcement. The "thin blue line" represents the police who stand between society and crime. There's a British version of the flag with a blue line across the Union Jack, and also a plain flag with a blue line on a black background. The name was inspired by an incident during the Crimean War, when a small detachment of British troops (wearing red uniforms) held off a Russian cavalry charge. The British press referred to the soldiers as the "thin red line," and that became a general term for a small group of people standing fast against an attack or threat.
     
  3. Barb

    Barb New Member

    Thank you Peter!

    I appreciate you answering my questions!
     
  4. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    .....
    I don't have "too much" of a "problem" with an image of a U.S. Flag being printed in the "vertical" position with the Union in the upper right-hand corner. It is, after all, an "image" of a U.S. Flag and NOT a U.S. Flag itself.

    Having said that, it does seem "weird" enough (to me) to the degree that whenever I see some kind of printed image of a vertical U.S. Flag with the Union in the upper right-hand corner my first thought is, "Well, that's the WRONG way!".

    The "Thin Blue Line" Flags that I've seen were all based on the U.S. Flag, and they were all printed Flags. They were black and white images with a BLUE stripe substituted for the first LONG white stripe (the one that runs the length of the Flag and passes directly below the Union). I have NOT seen the UK (or any other national) Flag.

    I do own a Peace Officer "In Memorium" Flag made by Annin that I either fly (@ half-staff along with my other Flags that I'm flying that day) or display on Peace Officers' Memorial Day, observed on May 15th of every year. Whenever May 15th occurs on the 3rd Saturday of May, that is also "Armed Forces Day" and ALL Flags are supposed to be flown at FULL-Staff.

    Robin
    .....
     

Share This Page