Flag etiquette for inclement weather

Discussion in 'Other US Flag Etiquette' started by Sam I Am, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. Sam I Am

    Sam I Am New Member

    I have had a flag, a pole, and recently purchased a light for display at night, however, I have yet to put it out because I am terrified I will put it out at the wrong time (sleep odd hours so an early morning raise wouldn't work). Sounds dumb, I know but I don't want to be out at 10 am raising a flag if it can be seen as disrespectful. Also, the weather raises another question: if it is raining it should always be brought in, right? I know there are all weather flags but I always get upset if I see a flag dripping in the rain, or should it be left alone as long as it isn't tattered. Like I said I have everything and want it out to honor those that serve and have served- I just don't want to display it incorrectly and seem disrespectful. Can they be left out 24/7 so long as they are lighted correctly and unworn? I would greatly appreciate any answers so I can get Old Glory in the air. Thank you.
     
  2. APS221

    APS221 Member

    Just fly the flag. Don't worry about putting it out at the wrong time. It's not disrespectful. Don't worry about taking the flag down if it rains while you're not at home. Modern flags can handle some rain. Don't worry about what some nosy busybody is going to say. Flying the flag is your right.
     
  3. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Agreed, but flying it respectfully is your responsibility.
     
  4. ShakinShooter

    ShakinShooter New Member

    how would you define inclement weather? My grandsons school won't fly the flag if it is a little windy. Yes we live in a wind tunnel and I can see not putting out the flag if the wind is at 40 mph or more, but in my opinion some wind is good. It causes the flag to unfurl and those of us who have fought for or have family who have fought for our country swell with pride to see it unfurled and waving. When I say anything I get told its inclement weather. My understanding of inclement weather is heavy rain or wind or snow. Am I wrong?
     
  5. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    .....
    Hello, ShakinShooter, and welcome to the USA-FLAG-SITE Forums!

    In my mind "inclement weather" is when there is MORE than an "average" amount of wind & precipitation. I live in western Oregon where there is a good chance that it will rain every once in a while. And, although it rains here from time-to-time, I don't see it as being "inclement weather", except for a few occasions. Around here, sleet, ice, and heavy "wet" snow (and lots of it), really contribute to what I would believe as being "inclement weather", no matter how high the wind speed is.

    Most Nylon and 2-ply spun Polyester Flags made in the USA are usually referred to as being "all weather" Flags. I prefer to think of them as being ALMOST "all weather" Flags because, in most cases, they are. The 2-ply spun polyester Flags were actually developed for "extreme" weather conditions, especially those that include high wind. But if you include heavy rain, sleet, ice, or snow to a high-wing situation, that won't do your Flag any good at all. In my experience, and in my mind, leaving any Flag, even an "all weather" Flag, up on a flagpole while the weather is "howling" would not be very wise and most certainly disrespectful.

    Perhaps the difficulty lies in the difference between people's opinions as to what, exactly, "inclement weather" is. One person's "spring-time shower" might be another person's "howling gale". I usually fly two Flags (U.S. & Oregon) attached to 7' spinning flagpoles mounted at each front corner of our house, and I put them out in the morning and bring them back in before it gets dark. However, when the weather forecast calls for heavy drenching rain throughout the day (or heavy snow, sleet, or ice) and/or winds above 20 MPH, I do NOT put my Flags out. I don't know if that is what the average Flag-flying homeowner does under those conditions, but it just happens to be something I always do.

    The bottom line, to me, is doing what is necessary to treat our Flags with respect. I realize that some folks will be a little more "cautious" when it comes to flying (or not flying) a Flag during a weather "event". But if they act out of an abundance of caution, remember that they are doing so out of respect for the Flag. And when it comes right down to it, isn't that what we all want?

    Perhaps if your Grandson's school used the 2-ply spun polyester Flags that are especially made for "extreme" weather conditions, they would be more inclined to fly their Flags more often during different weather conditions? It's just a thought. For all I know, they're already doing that.

    Anyway, as long as they, and we, are treating our Nation's Flag with the respect that is due, then what more can we ask?

    All this is just MY opinion, of course, but I hope that it presents a slightly different view that is worthy of your consideration.

    Thank You for bringing your Flag-related concern to our forum!

    Robin Hickman
    "Your Friendly Neighborhood Flag Man"
    Eugene, Oregon, USA.
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