flag on clothing dispute

Discussion in 'US Flags on Uniforms and Clothing' started by geekwanab, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. geekwanab

    geekwanab New Member

    My brother-in-law and I had a discussion about a sweater that had an embroidered U.S. fag on the front my wife had bought at a discount clothing store to be used in a sweater throw that she was making. I said that this was a violation of the U.S. fag etiquette code 4-d. He became very angry yelling that this was B.S. I e-mailed that specific code but it seems to be a little vague and brings up the question of clothing being made out of a flag or an article that may eventually be disposed of later such as decorations or napkins. The question is exactly is the rule on the image of the flag on clothing. Is that a violation of the code? His contention was he owned and wore T-shirts that had the image of the U.S. flag on them and that was patriotic and did not violate any rule.
     
  2. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    The current flag code states "The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery." It does not say the flag should not be used ON wearing apparel.

    The code goes on to say "No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform." I do not take that as a prohibition against wearing a flag on a sweater or other garment in a respectable manner.

    Nick A
    Columbia MD
     
  3. APS221

    APS221 Member

    I agree, since the code goes on to permit the wearing of a flag patch on uniforms. Clearly, the placement of a flag on a garment is not completely prohibited. I agree that the code indicates it should be done in a respectable manner.
     
  4. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    As Justice Holmes said in the quote down there at the bottom of my posts, the meaning of a symbol depends in part on who is viewing it and on the context. Most people would agree that wearing a clean T-shirt with a flag printed on it is an expression of patriotism. But -- what about a flag T-shirt that is torn and stained with oil and grease? Is the message patriotic ("I'm a hard-working American who's not afraid of getting his hands dirty") or derogatory ("I don't care if the symbol of the nation is stained and torn")? It all depends. Generally, flying a flag that is dirty and tattered is not considered to be very patriotic -- but what about the famous World War II poster that shows a such a flag with the caption "Remember Pearl Harbor"? Again, the difference is viewer perception and context.

    Peter Ansoff
     
  5. Kathrine321

    Kathrine321 New Member

    Flag on clothing dispute is so meaningful discussion. Because all the people not understand that great values about flag. They also print out the flags on your T-shirts, face, glasses of car, and many more outfit places. It’s a very bad effective consideration about yours country’s respect. And I don’t agree with this people’s opinion.
     
  6. Responders here seem to be jumping to section 4 of the flag code to glean their responses. They need to start at the beginning, the first paragraph, where it states, "The words 'flag, standard, colors, or ensign', as used herein, shall include any flag, standard, colors, ensign, or any picture or representation of either, or of any part or parts of either, made of any substance or represented on any substance, of any size evidently purporting to be either of said flag, standard, colors, or ensign of the United States of America or a picture or a representation of either, upon which shall be shown the colors, the stars and the stripes, in any number of either thereof, or of any part or parts of either, by which the average person seeing the same without deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag, colors, standard, or ensign of the United States of America." Simply stated, anything that represents the flag falls under the code as well.
     
  7. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    ....
    Greetings, "Always Right Sometimes"!

    Welcome to the USA-FLAG-SITE Forum!

    Sorry for "butting in", but it seems that you are referring only to the very last sentence in Section 3 of the "Flag Code" (United States Code Title 4 Chapter 1 — The Flag). Section 3, in its entirety, is solely dedicated (and limited) to the District of Columbia.

    Section 3 of the "Flag Code" in its entirety is as follows ( Source :
    http://www.ushistory.org/betsy/flagcode.htm ) :

    QUOTE : "§3. Use of flag for advertising purposes; mutilation of flag
    Any person who, within the District of Columbia, in any manner, for exhibition or display, shall place or cause to be placed any word, figure, mark, picture, design, drawing, or any advertisement of any nature upon any flag, standard, colors, or ensign of the United States of America; or shall expose or cause to be exposed to public view any such flag, standard, colors, or ensign upon which shall have been printed, painted, or otherwise placed, or to which shall be attached, appended, affixed, or annexed any word, figure, mark, picture, design, or drawing, or any advertisement of any nature; or who, within the District of Columbia, shall manufacture, sell, expose for sale, or to public view, or give away or have in possession for sale, or to be given away or for use for any purpose, any article or substance being an article of merchandise, or a receptacle for merchandise or article or thing for carrying or transporting merchandise, upon which shall have been printed, painted, attached, or otherwise placed a representation of any such flag, standard, colors, or ensign, to advertise, call attention to, decorate, mark, or distinguish the article or substance on which so placed shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine not exceeding $100 or by imprisonment for not more than thirty days, or both, in the discretion of the court. The words "flag, standard, colors, or ensign", as used herein, shall include any flag, standard, colors, ensign, or any picture or representation of either, or of any part or parts of either, made of any substance or represented on any substance, of any size evidently purporting to be either of said flag, standard, colors, or ensign of the United States of America or a picture or a representation of either, upon which shall be shown the colors, the stars and the stripes, in any number of either thereof, or of any part or parts of either, by which the average person seeing the same without deliberation may believe the same to represent the flag, colors, standard, or ensign of the United States of America."

    Thank You!

    Robin Hickman
    "Your friendly Neighborhood Flag Man"
    Eugene, Oregon, USA.

    .....
     
  8. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    This subject has already been covered in detail in this thread:

    www.usa-flag-site.org/forum/threads/definition-of-the-flag-in-the-u-s-flag-code.10718/#post-35147

    Just to summarize, the paragraph that ARS and Robin quoted is not part of the flag code per se -- it is a separate piece of legislation based on a model law developed by the American Flag Association. As Robin pointed out, it is applicable only to the District of Columbia. Also, it's very doubtful that it would ever be enforced. Taken literally, it says that a souvenir vendor on Constitution Avenue could be arrested, fined and jailed for selling a T-shirt or coffee cup with an American flag on it.
     

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