gold fringe

Discussion in 'US Flag Specs and Design' started by cw3armyone, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. thoreau

    thoreau New Member

    http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.milNational flags for Indoor Display (and for use in ceremonies and parades)



    For these purposes, the flag of the United States will be of rayon banner cloth or heavyweight nylon, trimmed on three sides with golden yellow fringe, 2 1/2 inches wide. It will be the same size or larger than other flags displayed or carried at the same time

    National flags for Indoor Display (and for use in ceremonies and parades);)



    For these purposes, the flag of the United States will be of rayon banner cloth or heavyweight nylon, trimmed on three sides with golden yellow fringe, 2 1/2 inches wide. It will be the same size or larger than other flags displayed or carried at the same time.

    Size: 4-foot 4-inch Hoist by 5-foot 6-inch Fly
    This size flag will be displayed with the United States Army flag, organizational flag of Army Commands, positional colors, the Corps of Cadets’ color, the 1st Battalion, 3d Infantry color, the 4-foot 4-inch by 5-foot 6-inch chapel flag and the individual flag of a General of the Army.
    Size: 3-foot Hoist by 4-foot Fly
    This size flag will be displayed with the Army Field flag, distinguishing flags, organizational colors, and institutional flags of the same size. It will also be displayed within the offices listed in c below when no other positional or organizational flags are authorized.

    Authorization for Indoor Display



    The flag of the United States is authorized for indoor display for each:

    (a) Office, headquarters, and organization authorized a positional color, distinguishing flag, or organizational color.
    (b) Organization of battalion size or larger, temporary or permanent, not otherwise authorized a flag of the United States.
    (c) Military offices not otherwise authorized an indoor flag of the United States, for the purpose of administering oaths of office.
    (d) Military courtroom.
    (e) US Army element of joint commands, military groups, and missions. One flag is authorized for any one headquarters operating in a dual capacity.
    (f) Subordinate element of the US Army Recruiting Command.
    (g) ROTC unit.
    (h) Senior Executive Service (SES) employee for permanent retention.
     
  2. polarman

    polarman New Member

    well i might as well jump in on this the frinde was real gold and silver bullion up to a point then they stopped the use of real bullion it,s a decoration for the office of the president thats why the frindge you dont want a vistor from another country to enter the oval office to a cheap flag. come on it,s the president he,s the boss with the corrner offlce.
     
  3. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Hello, thoreau,

    The information in your last post is quoted from AR 840-10, which is the US Army regulation dealing with flags and related matters. It says that the US Army uses fringed American flags for indoor display and in parades. That's all it says. It doesn't say that the use of fringes is reserved to the military, or that the fringes have any symbolic meaning.

    Actually, not all of the Armed Forces use fringes on their flags. The corresponding Marine Corps order (MCO P10520.3B) says "The use of fringe on national colors or standards within the Marine Corps is prohibited." The Army uses fringes, the Marines don't.

    There's a group of folks out there who have conocted a silly story that the fringe on a US flag has some kind of hidden, sinister meaning. As you've seen from the threads here in the forum, they post the same information over and over again. It's mostly quotes that are faked or taken out of context from the 1959 Executive Order, AR 840-10, and the 1925 Attorney General's opinion. None of these documents actually says anything about the fringe having any symbolism whatsoever. In fact, the 1925 opinion quotes a War Department circular that says the opposite:

    "For a number of years there has been prescribed in Army Regulations a knotted fringe of yellow silk on the national standards of mounted regiments and on the national colors of unmounted regiments. The War Department, however, knows of no law which either requires or prohibits the placing of a fringe on the flag of the United States. No Act of Congress or Executive Order has been found bearing on the question. In flag manufacture a fringe is not considered to be a part of the flag, and it is without heraldic significance."

    One of the purposes of this forum is to provide correct and accurate information about the American flag, and to refute information that's wrong. Please help us out here.

    Peter Ansoff
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2015

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