Half-staffed for Non-Dignitary

Discussion in 'Half Mast / Half Staff' started by EmailPoster, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. EmailPoster

    EmailPoster New Member

    Who has the authority to determine when the american flag can be flown...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2006
  2. jproffitt10

    jproffitt10 Guest

    Terri,

    The President has the authority to order the flag at half-mast to honor the deaths of important governemnt figures, past and present and for the deaths of other officials and foreign diginitaaries. In the United States Flag Code it is a rather lengthy passage, Section 3(m). This authority covers all official governmental offices, organizations and units and generally is also followed by most state and local offices, dpeartments and organizations. But for local officials, organizations or groups who want to mourn an important death it is common for the flag to fly at half-staff. While some advocate using black ribbon or other such honorary decorations instead of flying the flag half-staff, it is a personal practice that will certainly continue.
     
  3. Jessie Tan

    Jessie Tan Guest

    Hello
    I have just joined this forum and am new. I have a question based on a situation of mourning and will really appreciate it if someone can help me based on the guidelines of the American Flag.....
    1. There are 2 flag, one is a national flag of a country and one is a flag of an international organisation or movement (for example the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts), which has a standard rule of never flying it at half-mast. In the situation that these 2 flags are flown on flag poles side by side each other and there was a national instruction of flying the national flag at half-mast, can the other flag not follow the national flag at half-mast but following its protocol of tying a black ribbon/bow on the top of the flag? That would mean the other flag will be higher than the national flag, which should have a more honoured position. Is this acceptable?
    Thank you.
    Jessie Tan
     

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