New to the Forum. First Vintage (48 Star) Flag!

Discussion in 'Flag Identification and Collecting' started by George Robinson, Jun 25, 2015.

  1. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

    I have recently bought a "vintage" Valley Forge 48 star American Flag. The flag has a tight weave and reinforcement fabric near the grommets. According the identification chart the flag is in the 1940-58 range as it says "VALLEY FORGE FLAG CO 5X9 1/2 FT." all on one line and the labeling has a little bit of fading but is quite legible. The flag is in great condition and looks like it has never been flown with appliqued stars and no fading of any of the fabric and definitely smells like storage. I was told that it was an Estate sale and was in the "normal" folded up way like a triangle. I've noticed though that there is no stitching on the top and bottom outer edges, how is this fabric reinforced? What kind of material could this be? (cotton/wool blend, etc.) My assumption about the age of this flag seems to be early 40s or probably before? It seems as if from what I've read, the town and state was added later in the 40s/50s where the labeling that doesn't state the location was the earlier version (early 40s late 30s?). It also seems that the reinforcement squares were of an earlier design as well. The header isn't stretched and the grommets show no wear. There is also 3 rows of stitching around the canton and the fly of the flag. I will post photos soon but was just curious to see what people think (without visuals) about the age, materials, and so forth of this flag.
     
  2. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

    so I need to be a member for 30 days or have at least 50 posts... to post photos?...
     
  3. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  4. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  5. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  6. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  7. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  8. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  9. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  10. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

  11. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

    any input about materials and dating would be appreciated... fyi.. hand washing old smell and dirt out of it is quite fun.. and tedious, especially with all that red. and I forgot to mention before... but the cotton or wool blend was a stiff rough kind of feel... not like soft bed sheets or my Army wool blanket (somewhere in between)... I hope that helps... ha ha !
     
  12. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

    ok, I've just noticed that majority of the 48 star flags from Valley Forge have two rows of stitching on the "fly" end of their cantons... where mine has three rows... is this another modification to determine years of manufacture?
     
  13. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Hello George Robinson, and welcome to the USA Flag Forum.
    Your flag is the typical size for a casket flag, or internment flag, used at the funeral of veterans of the US Armed Forces. The material is cotton bunting, and the top and bottom edges are "selvaged" or "self-edged:" an edge produced on woven fabric during manufacture that prevents it from unraveling. The flag is identical to many such flags issued to the families of WW-II veterans, though the same flag could have been used for a Spanish-American War, WW-I or Korean War vet up to 1959.
     
  14. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

    thank you for your input! and I love this forum!... why would the cotton bunting feel so rough and stiff though?... that's what makes me think it's a blend... I have cotton flags in my collection and they are WAAAAYYYY softer then this "scrubby pad"... and what's with the tri-stitch at the end of the canton?.. only flags I've seen like that were from around the 1943 and earlier times... Non-the-less... I personally think this flag is at least 70 years old...
     
  15. George Robinson

    George Robinson New Member

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