Proper flag disposal

Discussion in 'American Flag Disposal' started by EmailPoster, Jun 6, 2006.

  1. Roger

    Roger New Member

    Trust me, hearing what others had to say is why I am hear and registered. The Northern part of redneck Minnesota is where I live. Here we have a very unique attitude towards this country, we will fight for it to the death!!! Our little (actualy big) part of it is more important to preserve than any other part, to us. One of the last strong holds for gun laws and the right to bear arms. Seems like once you get above Iowa, South Dakota, Oregon the rules change. Hell some folks still have gun racks in their beat up trucks! But our outdoors is important to us. I do what I can and I don't burn garbage. While I'm not a fanatical recycler I do see this great nylon fabric 5'x8' as something to reuse instead of purchasing more fabric that will never degrade in my life, or my kids life, or their kids life. I guess I could down size....LOL

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  2. Roger

    Roger New Member

    How about I make a couple real cool and dignified helmet bags and have a burning ceremony and burial for the rest?
     
  3. RODEONan

    RODEONan New Member

    Howdy :) I'm new here, but thought I'd see what the internet has regarding disposal of worn Flags and I found this MB.

    I was raised that in disposing of the Flag that the blue field with the stars was to be cut away from the red and white stripes of the Flag(s). Then the red and white stripes are to be burned in a container and the blue field and stars should be burned in a separate container with the ashes from both to be buried separately. That's what I had learned in grade school way back when.

    I bought a couple of boxes of books from my boys old country school and there was a book about the United States Flag and it's etiquette. Of course I can't find it right now, but it's an older book. Anyway, I agree that the Flag should be disposed of in a dignified way when it becomes to tattered to be flown. While some people/groups may have the basic belief of burning the Flag and burying the ashes it's just some have differing ways of preparing the Flag for the disposal.

    As long as the burning/burying is handled in a respectful way I see no reason to get after anyone for either burning the Flag whole, separating the blue field from the rest of the Flag or even separating the red and white stripes as long as they are burned and buried in a dignified and respectful manner then it's all good.

    As for 're-purposing' the material into other things..... in my opinion, no. Yes, that thought follows the recycling bit we're all being fed, but this is the Flag of our country. If one wants to make something that has the colors of the Flag or Flags on it, then buy that material and go from there. Do not use the Flag for anything other than what it was made for, please. That's just the way I was raised.

    Semper Fi & peace
     
  4. BigCountry

    BigCountry New Member

    Your forgetting "Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends" John 15:13
     
  5. Ky Patriot

    Ky Patriot New Member

    I used to camp every year with fathers and sons from several churches in our denomination. For several of those years, we held flag retirement ceremonies on the first night after it got dark. The campfire was the only light and the ceremony was very respectful. I am aware that some like to cut the flag into pieces because at this point it is no longer a flag and in their thinking cannot be disrespected. I do not like to cut the flag. We unfold and display the largest one while reading or quoting text about its honorable service to the country. We treat it as respectfully as you would a fallen comrade. I have seen grown men cry after the ceremony and thank me for the experience. The idea that only military and scouts can do this is incorrect. Anyone can do it without breaking any of the flag code if they do it respectfully. Some of our participants were former military, JROTC, scouts and ordinary dads and respectful boys. I wish every young boy old enough to understand could experience this.
     

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