Proper way to display 3 equal building flags

Discussion in 'US Flag Display' started by Dittoz, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. Dittoz

    Dittoz New Member

    Our business has a brick front to it with 3 brick columns. The three columns have a flag holder in them, all at the same height. I'm not sure what kind of flag configuration I should fly with this scenario. I'd like to fly our state flag in there, but is it appropriate to fly two US flags and a state flag in any manner? For example facing the front of the building: US, US, State? Because I'm pretty sure the state flag shouldn't go in the middle, even though that might look better.
     
  2. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    Greetings, Dittoz !

    Welcome to the USA-Flag-Site Forums !

    A similar question to yours was posted in the following thread :

    http://www.usa-flag-site.org/forum/three-poles-three-flags-need-proper-1027.html

    With three columns each having a flagholder at the same heighth, you have two choices.

    CHOICE #1: With the flags mounted on the three columns, the U.S. Flag would go on its own right (the observer's left), the State Flag (assuming you're IN the USA) would be in the middle, and your company's flag would be on YOUR right.

    [ IF your company doesn't have an "official" flag, then you can substitute the flag of the city that you're located in. IF the city doesn't have an official flag, I recommend that you fly the "POW/MIA" Flag in the third postion. ]

    I'm not sure how they did it, but DirtFisher posted a graphic that perfectly illustrated the Flag flying protocol. I'll see if I can "transplant the graphic here.

    OK. Got it!

    Imagine that you're standing on the sidewalk in front of your building where the Flags are flying from poles mounted on the three columns. I know the graphic shows three poles, but bear with me here.

    [​IMG]
    #1 #2 #3

    From where YOU are observing them, the U.S. Flag is on the left (its own right) at the #1 position, the State Flag is in the center at the #2 position, and the company's, or city's, or POW/MIA Flag is on the right in the #3 position.

    Hopefully, all that makes sense to you!

    CHOICE #2 : You could fly the U.S. Flag from the MIDDLE column IF any of the following scenarios could be met.

    IF flagholder on the CENTER column was 6" or so HIGHER than the others, then you could mount the U.S. Flag in the middle.

    OR, if the holders were all at the same height and the pole on which the U.S. Flag was mounted was longer (say, at least a foot), then you could mount the U.S. Flg in the middle. The U.S. Flag on a 6' pole and the other two (on the outsides) on 5' poles.

    OR, if the U.S. Flag were at least one size larger than the other two. For example, the U.S. Flag was 4'x6' and the other two were 3'x5'.

    BEST would be a larger U.S. Flag, mounted on a longer pole, and attached higher up on the middle column.

    IF I'm wrong (and there are NO guarantees that I'm not), someone with more experience and expertese will be by here in two shakes of a lamb's tail to set it right!

    Hope this helps!

    Robin "Let's Check the U.S. Code, Title 36, Chapter 10!" Hickman
     
  3. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    OOPS !!! :eek:

    I forgot to add a couple of things.....

    If the flags are going to be flying 24/7, they should be illuminated during the nighttime hours when it's dark. I believe that they should be illuminated with lights specifically for that purpose (ie. the only reason the lights are there is to illuminate the Flags. No Flags = No lights.). Some people are of the opinion that any old light will do, just as long as the U.S. Flag is illuminated at night (ie. a U.S. Flag mounted on a porch an illiuminated by the porch light.).

    IF the three Flags are NOT going to be flown 24/7, and instead are going to be posted in the morning, fly all day, and then struck in the evening and placed inside the building overnight, then they "should" be done so in a particular order.

    In the morning, they should be posted with the U.S. Flag (#1) first, followed by the State Flag (#2) second, and the POW/MIA Flag (#3) last.

    In the evening, they should be struck in reverse order: POW/MIA Flag (#3) first, State Flag (#2) second, and the U.S. Flag (#1) last.

    Morning = #1, #2, and #3.
    Evening = #3, #2, and #1.

    Keep 'Em Flying !!!

    Robin "By The Numbers" Hickiman
     
  4. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    I don't think that Robin's posts really addressed Dittoz's original question. Dittoz wants to fly two US flags and one state flag on equal-height holders. The flag code is pretty clear that "No other flag or pennant should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the flag of the United States . . ." Based on this guidance, and assuming three staffs of equal height, it sounds like the correct option is US/US/State in order from the viewer's left to right. If you really want the state flag in the middle, you could make the state flag's staff shorter than the other two. That way, the state flag would not "on the same level" as the two US flags.

    Peter Ansoff
     
  5. Or.... you could fly THREE US flags, and put the state flag under the center US flag... That of course if your poles can facilitate that...
     
  6. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    Two shakes of a lamb's tale came pretty fast !

    I stand corrected !

    I still stand by my suggestion of using a company, city, or POW/MIA Flag as the third one. Especially the POW/MIA Flag.

    IF (big IF) Dittoz uses my suggestion to use the POW/MIA Flag as the third one, wouldn't it end up in the middle (#2) postion instead of on the viewer's far right (#3) postion?

    Robin "Maybe I'm Confused. Maybe I'm Not. I Don't Know" Hickman
     
  7. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    IF (big IF) Dittoz uses my suggestion to use the POW/MIA Flag as the third one, wouldn't it end up in the middle (#2) postion instead of on the viewer's far right (#3) postion?

    Actually, no. According to military regulations, the POW/MIA flag would be last in the order of precedence. The Order would be US/State/POW-MIA. There are a couple of threads in the "Other Flags" section dealing with the precedence of the POW/MIA flag.

    Peter Ansoff
     
  8. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    Ah..... I stand corrected again !

    Originally, I thought that the POW/MIA flag would go in the #3 position on the viewer's far right. Then I remembered that I'd seen somewhere that it would go immediately after or below the U.S. Flag. I vaguely remember that it MIGHT have had something to do with a military situation. It might have also had something to do with a specific "Flag Holiday" such as, Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Veterans' Day, Navy Day, etc.

    Oh, well.....

    Robin "I Guess I'll Have To Keep Looking" Hickman
     
  9. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Originally, I thought that the POW/MIA flag would go in the #3 position on the viewer's far right. Then I remembered that I'd seen somewhere that it would go immediately after or below the U.S. Flag.

    The US Code just says that "Display of the POW/MIA flag . . . shall be in a manner designed to ensure visibility to the public."

    Military regulations do specify that the POW/MIA flag will be flown under the US flag, and it's often displayed that way at non-military sites such as Post Offices. However, such sites do not normally display state or other organizational flags. The Air Force Protocol Instruction (AFI 34-1201) says "There is no precedence for the POW/MIA flag. It shall always be displayed in a location subordinate to all other flags." As far as I remember, the other servcies' regs don't say anything one way or the other about the precedence of the POW/MIA flag.

    Of course, the USC and the military regs deal with the display of the POW/MIA flag by government entities. Private organizations and citizens can use those references for guidance, but there's nothing that says that are required to follow them.

    Peter Ansoff
     

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