The "Millar Flag"

Discussion in 'American Flag History' started by APS221, Jul 4, 2012.

  1. APS221

    APS221 Member

    I came across this article on the Wall Street Journal's website.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304211804577501441816539490.html

    I agree with the view that the flag is supposed to be a Continental Colors/Grand Union Flag. I don't think the "dots" are stars. It looks more like an attempt to depict the blue triangles in the union of the flag. I also don't know why he chose to add blue stripes.
     
  2. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    I agree with the view that the flag is supposed to be a Continental Colors/Grand Union Flag. I don't think the "dots" are stars. It looks more like an attempt to depict the blue triangles in the union of the flag.

    I agree. The scene on the powder horn is clearly a panorama of the British evaculation of Boston in March 1776, and the Continental Colors is used to show the positions of the American forces.

    I also don't know why he chose to add blue stripes.

    I suspect that he's seen the well-known painting of the American brig Lexington being captured by HMS Alert, which does show a Continental Colors with red, white and blue stripes. However, that's the only example that I know of. There is at least one contemporary illustration, and a couple of written descriptions, indicating that the stripes were red and white. That's not to say that there weren't other combinations -- one of the ships in the first Continental squadron apparently had an ensign with red and green stripes. However, it seems clear that red and white was the norm.

    I've run across John Millar before, and this sort of thing is very typical of him. I discussed another example in one of the appendicies in my First Navy Jack paper.

    Peter Ansoff
     

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