U.s. Flag With China Flag

Discussion in 'Other Flags' started by batch362, Apr 30, 2008.

  1. batch362

    batch362 New Member

    My daughter is Chinese and I would like to fly the China flag (with the U.S. flag), one day a year (on the day we received her) however I have 2 questions.
    1) Can I expect negative feedback from those who might disfavor that flag being flown?
    2) I will fly it with the U.S. flag higher but these staffs are on the front of my house. I know the U.S. flag is supposed to be to the right of other flags but from what perspective? My house is an entity, like a ship, and right or starboard would be from the perspective of the entity, that being facing the street. What would be the rationale for it being from the perspective of looking at the house which is how it will be seen? Which is correct?
     
  2. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Hi, welcome!

    1) Can I expect negative feedback from those who might disfavor that flag being flown?

    This is a somewhat tricky question, and we've discussed it a lot here in the forum. The problem is that a flag can represent two different things: a cultural heritage and a government. Your dilemma is typical: you want to honor your daughter's culture, but you don't want to be seen as showing support for a repressive regime.

    Based on my personal experience, I don't think that you will have too many problems. Most people have no idea what the Chinese flag looks like to begin with, and those that do will understand if you explain it to them.

    The Vietnamese-American community has addressed this problem in an interesting way -- they use the old flag of South Vietnam as the symbol of their heritage. There is a large Vietnamese community here in Annandale, and it's common to see the red-and-yellow flag on businesses and homes.

    2) I will fly it with the U.S. flag higher but these staffs are on the front of my house. I know the U.S. flag is supposed to be to the right of other flags but from what perspective? My house is an entity, like a ship, and right or starboard would be from the perspective of the entity, that being facing the street. What would be the rationale for it being from the perspective of looking at the house which is how it will be seen? Which is correct?

    Firstly, you really don't want to fly the US flag higher than the Chinese flag. General usage says that the flag of one nation should not be flown above the flag of another. The US flag should be on the right from the perspective of someone standing behind the flags and facing the street -- that's "the flag's own right." To an observer looking at the house from the street, the US flag will be on the left. (There is a similar rule in heraldry: the right, or "dexter" side of the knight's shield is the side to his own right -- it's the *left* side as seen by someone who is standing in front of him .)

    Just by the by, you can also buy replicas of the traditional Chinese "dragon and ball" flag. I have one and I fly it on Chinese New Year.

    Could you post a picture here of the US and Chinese flags flying on your house?

    Best,

    Peter Ansoff
     
  3. batch362

    batch362 New Member

    Thanks so much for your info Peter. It saved me alot of trouble! I will post the photo. My daughter's "gotcha day" is on May 28 so look for it shortly after that. I will also fly my son's South Korean flag on his "gotcha day" and will post that as well. Thanks again.

    MB
     

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