US Ensign No. 10 Mare Island May 1927

Discussion in 'Flag Identification and Collecting' started by jimmymacky, May 25, 2013.

  1. jimmymacky

    jimmymacky New Member

    I was given this flag. It is in rough condition. one the stars was replaced. It appears the end of the flag was repaired as the thread is black and the flag is shorter. I would like try to find some information about this flag as it is dated May 1927. Any help would be appreciated.
     
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  2. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Hello jimmymacky and welcome to the USA Flag Forum. Mare Island was a Naval Shipyard on San Francisco Bay where the navy constructed many things from submarines to flags. The term Ensign refers to the USA National Flag flown from the stern of ships. A Jack consists of just the field of stars and flies from the bow when a ship is in port. The "No 10" designation was the size. The largest size was a #1 and was flown from battleships. The smallest size was #12 and would have been used on small boats. You said one of the stars was replaced. If you are referring to the left-most star in the top row, it was usually placed on a reinforced portion of the canton nearest the top of the pole because that is the point of greatest stress. It was common practice toe re-hem the end of flags - that was one of the reasons that naval flags around the world tend to be almost twice as long as they are wide so they could trim away the frayed portion and square off the flag.

    Anything else you want to know? A photo or two would help us estimate the value of your flag, but realistically the price range is $25 to $150 depending on condition.

    Nick
    Columbia Maryland
     
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  3. jimmymacky

    jimmymacky New Member

    Hi Nick, thank you for the prompt reply. I'm attaching some photos of the flag to help ID it. What size ship would a Ensign #10 been flown. How long would they keep the flag in service. I wonder if it got to WWII. I have a great interest in military history, particularly WWI & WWII. I'm more interested in historical information about it, than its value. If it has some historical significance I would like to donate it to group or museum. old flag #1.jpg old flag #2.jpg old flag #3.jpg old flag #4.jpg old flag #5.jpg
     
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  4. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    Thanks for the photos. The chart on this web page: Flag Sizes
    shows that a Number 10 Ensign would be 5 and one-half feet long. Yours has clearly been repaired numerous times.
    That website also notes that the Number 10 Ensign would fly from vessels that are small enough to be classified as "boats." The captain's launch, and PT boat are two examples. There are other members of this forum who are much more expert than I on official military/naval flag use.

    Nick
    Columbia Maryland
     
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  5. jimmymacky

    jimmymacky New Member

    Hi Nick, thanks again for the quick response. You have really helped me increase my knowledge of flags. This a new area of history for me. I wish that flag could talk, I would love to know where it has been.
    Jim
    San Diego Calif
     
  6. Nice piece of history! Thanks for sharing it!
     
  7. Lawraangel

    Lawraangel New Member

    While you have a flag with a single star missing(now replaced) I have a single star from the USS Maine inwhich I am hoping to piece with the originial flag! lol Great piece of history you have..
     
  8. virginia trux

    virginia trux New Member

    Hi guys! I too have a tattered WWII flag (I think). US ENSIGN NO 10 MARE ISLAND DEC 1943 is printed across the top. The top 2 stars are reinforced as stated in an earlier message. It was fun to stumble upon this thread! Thanks for the info. I am thinking to have it framed between two pieces of plexiglass. I want to hang it in my living room and think of my dad each day
     
  9. Dexter Cole

    Dexter Cole Member

    Virginia, we'd love to see photos of your fathers flag if you can. Since he brought it home from the war it obviously had special meaning for him. I also love your idea of framing it. Too many of these are sold at yard sales.

    The flag that started this thread was in all likelihood tattered, then resewn with a straight right edge. If yours is tattered (from being flown) then I hope you leave it that way. I have two or three and they still look like they're flying when tattered and framed.
     
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  10. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    …..
    Greetings, Virginia!

    I have a size #9 U.S. Ensign (Flag) that was made at the Mare Island Navy Base's "Flag Shop" in 1044. Stenciled on the canvas hoist ("header") Mare Island is listed as "M.I.", and the year (1944), and the size "9". It is the very first, and thus far, the ONLY U.S. Flag that I've ever seen with its Stars PAINTED on!

    If you choose to have your Father's Flag "Framed", do your best to get some expert advice on how to best "preserve" and frame the Flag, then follow that advice. Although I am NOT an "expert" in this area, preserving textiles, such as Flags, requires a few steps and involves using "special" methods and materials to do it properly.

    One thing I think your should consider doing when framing your Father's Flag, is to use UV (Ultraviolet Light) resistant glass. The greatest threat to Flags that are out of the elements (ie. framed behind glass) is ultraviolet light. So put your Father's Flag behind UV "blocking" glass so that it won't fade into hues of pink, gray, and violet.

    And I concur with Dexter Cole: by all means please take some pictures of your Father's Flag and post them here for all of us to see and appreciate!

    Thank You!

    Robin Hickman
    "Your Friendly Neighborhood Flag Man"
    Eugene, Oregon, USA.
    …..
     
  11. Keith

    Keith New Member

    I was given a similar flag. I am hoping some one might be so kind and help me identify my flag. The flag is 13 stars and is stamped US Ensign No. 10
    Navy Yard New York April 1911 C.7160. Would you know what kind of ship it was flown on and purpose? Thanks
     
  12. Dexter Cole

    Dexter Cole Member

    Keith, if you go back in this section of the forum to a thread titled "New project, don't laugh" you will see that I have almost the identical flag although it's in really bad shape. It's mostly self explanatory, it was made in 1911 in New York. It's a Navy flag, for a Navy ship. The number 10 refers to its size. I wish I knew what the "C 7160" means since my flag is marked the same. I don't know why or when they flew these 13 star flags but someone should respond who is more knowledgeable than I. An internet search might also give you an answer. Often flags from ships were given to officers/crew members as a reward, retirement etc.
     
    Keith likes this.
  13. Dexter Cole

    Dexter Cole Member

    Keith, I just read that the flag (yours, not the one that started this thread) is used for boats and small crafts. It's use was discontinued prior to WW1 but some remained in inventory into the 1950's.
     
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