Were 38 Star Flags produced for 1876 Centenial?

Discussion in 'Flag Identification and Collecting' started by newblue44, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. newblue44

    newblue44 New Member

    Once again I would like to thank everyone for devoting their time to this wonderful site!!!!

    I greatly appreciate all the help!! I do have a couple more questions though.

    1) How many 38 star flags (if any) were produced for the 1876 Centenial?

    2) Previously I had spoken with NAVA1974, american_flag_uk & Robin Hickman. They were all extremely helpful. We had discussed alot of points about our families 38 star flag. I would still like to get an idea as to the value of the flag. I was wondering if someone could help me with a price range for a flag of this type, age & overall condition? Not an exact $ figure just a basic idea of the price range. My previous posts are under New pics & questions about an old 38 star flag (in flag identification). There are numerous pictures included with those posts.

    Thanks so much!!!!!

    Newblue44
     
  2. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    1) Millions. Flagmakers today do not release sales figures. They didn't back then either. And even if they did, flagmakers, oddly enough, do not seem to have any sense of history and routinely discard "old stuff" like obsolete flags and information that collectors would drool over. Officially the 38 star flag didn't start until July 4, 1877, but no flagmaker in their right mind kept producing 37s once Colorado was admitted. Indeed there were probably more 39 star flags produced in 1876 than either 37s or 38s as everyone expected Dakota to be admitted.
    Regards,
    Nick
    2) Your flag is worth between $250 and $350 on eBay, and maybe twice that from an antique dealer. If the flag were of a displayable size, ie about three feet long, it would be worth about $500 and you could double or triple that figure if it were nicely framed.
    Unfortunately there is not much of a market for very large to huge antique flags. They take up too much display space.
     
  3. Robin Hickman

    Robin Hickman Well-Known Member

    .
    Welcome Back, NewBlue44 ! :D


    QUOTE : "1) How many 38 star flags (if any) were produced for the 1876 Centenial?"


    I rather doubt that there were any "official" 38-Star Flags manufactured for our Nation's Centennial in 1876. The "official" Flag at the time of the Centennial (7-04-1876) had only 37 Stars.

    That is because although Colorado (The Centennial State) WAS admitted to the Union as its 38th State in 1876, the event did NOT take place until AFTER July 4th, 1876 (August 1st, to be exact).

    Thus, the 38-Star Flag did NOT become "official" until July 4th, 1877. The 38-Star Flag was official for 13 years : From July 4, 1877 to July 3, 1890.

    BUT..... Who knows how many UNOFFICIAL 38-Star Flags were made by the good folks of Colorado to celebrate our Country's Centennial !!! :D

    I hope that adequately addresses your first question. As for your second question, I haven't a clue (sorry!).


    Robin Hickman
    .
     
  4. newblue44

    newblue44 New Member

    I knew Colorado was admitted in 1876 but did'nt know if 38 star flags were produced before 1877. Thanks for the info. I kinda hoped the value of the flag was higher, but I see your point about displaying the larger flags.
    I really appreciate all of your help.


    Thanks!!!!

    Newblue44
     
  5. newblue44

    newblue44 New Member

    Nava 1974 said that there were many 38 star flags produced in 1876, along with even more 39s. But like you said the were not really official untill 1877. I figured they weren't made at all until 1877.
    I really appreciate all of your help. Thanks to all for devoting their time to this wonderful site!!!!

    Thanks!!!!

    Newblue44
     
  6. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    "Nava 1974 said that there were many 38 star flags produced in 1876, along with even more 39s. But like you said the were not really official untill 1877. I figured they weren't made at all until 1877."

    There is no penalty for making flags with new stars for new states, so there was no reason for a flagmaker to wait until the following July 4 to start making the new flags. If he did, potential customers would buy their new flags from his competitors who ignored the 1818 law and began making flags with the new star(s) added as soon as the word came out that a new state had joined, in this case, August of 1876.

    The fact that there are many flags with 39, 40, and 42 stars, and even a good number of 47-star flags proves that flagmakers anticipated the new designs. Also the extreme scarcity of 43-star flags tells me that they started making 44-star flags shortly after Wyoming became a state about a week after the 43-star flag became "official," and that no one continued making 43-star flags during the remaining 11+ months until July 4, 1891.

    One more thing. If you check a copy of the U.S. Army regulations printed in the latter half of the 19th C you will see that it says the flag of the United Sates has the number of stars corresponding to the number of states in the union. It does not require that they wait until the following July 4.

    Nick
     

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