What is the meaning of the gold fringe on american flag?

Discussion in 'US Flag Specs and Design' started by rudy, May 20, 2009.

  1. rudy

    rudy New Member

    What Is The Meaning Of The Gold Fringe Around The American Flag?
     
  2. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    There is no meaning. It is purely decorative, free of any sinister implications regarding martial law or any other military or government intrusion. This topic has been discussed extensively elsewhere in this Forum. Go to the "search" feature, type in "fringe" and even if you only search the titles you will find enough to answer this question.
     
  3. kyle82

    kyle82 New Member

    no meaning? really isnt it that every detail of the flag should have meaning. in our flag.. i mean not to mention the country, there is a significance for each design that has been making up the flag.. :)
     
  4. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    The heading has no meaning. The grommets have no meaning. They are only functional elements that let you fly the flag from a pole. The fringe has no meaning. It is a decoration like the fringe on the bottom of a theater curtain. It has no political symbolism attached to it whatsoever. The fact that US Military Specifications call for a fringe does not mean that any place you see a fringed flag is under martial law any more than when my parish specifies that they want fringe on their flag that every place you see a fringed flag is a church.
     
  5. Edenline Phillips

    Edenline Phillips New Member

    I believe the true significance of the Gold fringe on American flag is that the politicians and central bankers were so alarmed at such a thing that they made sure it was packed by an array of Keynesians and monetarists.
     
  6. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member


    How many Keynesians can you pack into 16 feet of gold fringe?
     
  7. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    We've had a lot of postings here about gold fringes, but I think that this is the first time that I've seen an economic interpretation! Interesting!

    Peter A.
     
  8. Gaven32

    Gaven32 New Member

    It is an respectable enrichment only, not a fundamental element of the the flag. The edge is used only within or on a team when taken outside by a wearer, it is never traveled from a team or post outside (the edge would fray). As there is no wind flow to shift a the flag when within, the silver edge contributes a component of "prettiness", nothing more.
     
  9. Gaven32

    Gaven32 New Member

    Any comment?

    supported living community
     
  10. NAVA1974

    NAVA1974 Active Member

    No. Fringe on flags has been discussed extensively in this Forum. Fringe is purely decorative, and does not change the meaning of the flag whatsoever.
     
  11. Peter Ansoff

    Peter Ansoff USA Flag Site Admin

    Gaven32 wrote:

    "It is an respectable enrichment only, not a fundamental element of the the flag. The edge is used only within or on a team when taken outside by a wearer, it is never traveled from a team or post outside (the edge would fray). As there is no wind flow to shift a the flag when within, the silver edge contributes a component of "prettiness", nothing more."

    I am intrigued by this post, because it seems to be a machine translation of a paragraph that shows up in a lot of places on the net that discuss fringes on flags. The original version reads:

    "It is an honorable enrichment only, not an integral part of the flag. . . .The fringe is used only inside or on a staff when carried outside by a bearer, it is never flown from a staff or pole outside (the fringe would fray). As there is no wind to move a flag when inside, the gold fringe adds an element of "prettiness", nothing more."

    The translator (human or mechanical) used alternative meanings for many of the words, which made the final version very puzzling to read. For example, "The fringe is used only inside or on a staff" became "The edge is used only within or on a team" -- "staff" can mean both a pole and a group of people, and the translator picked the wrong meaning. Similarly, "bearer" becomes "wearer", "flown" becomes "traveled", etc.

    Gaven32, could you tell us where you originally found this paragraph, and what language it was in?
     

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